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the pilgrim

Our Lady of Ashes is maintained by David Mayeux:

A Roman Catholic lost in the land of unlikeness, searching for the imago dei within and making his way to our æternal home.

David calls Asheville, NC home in the meantime, a member of St. Lawrence Parish, stay-at-home father of two. He is interested in personal praxis, catechesis & mystagogy, Tolkien's sub-creation, story, myth & song, literature, philology, medieval theology, evangelization, and general Catholic Nerd-dom. He is a Servant of the Secret Fire.

Google+ profile for my non-faith related interests.

Popular posts from this blog

Mystagogy: The Rod, the Root, and the Flower pt III

'There shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root.' [Isaiah 11:1]

'My covenant shall be in your flesh.' [Genesis 13:17]

Part three of my reflections on Coventry Patmore's short religious thoughts in The Rod, The Root, and the Flower [Part I and Part II]

From "Homo"
VIII - Creation is nothing but a concerted piece, consisting of representative repetitions and variations of and harmonious commentaries upon the simple theme, God, who is defined by St. Thomas as an Act—the Act of love, the 'embrace' of the First and Second Persons, and their unity is the thence proceeding Spirit of Life, 'Creator Spiritus', the Life and Joy of all things. In this divine contrapuntal music, plagues, the sack of cities, and hell itself (according to St. Augustine) are but discords necessary to emphasize, exalt, and illustrate the harmony. If Beethoven and Back are but senseless noise to the untrained ears of the …

Mystagogy Reading: The Rod, the Root, and the Flower by Coventry Patmore, Pt I

The Rod, the Root, and the Flower by Coventry Patmore is a collection of aphorisms expounding the culmination of Patmore's spiritual thought. Patmore is a poet of the the late nineteenth century, a member of the Christian Romantics, poets who found the Romantic movement in and of itself, too bereft of religion, intellect and philosophy, but found inspiration in the Romantics' rejection of the Rationalist philosophy, and their return to allegory, symbolism, and medieval imagery. Patmore was considered a mystic and was popular in his day though that waned after his conversion to Catholocism, which still made someone something of a persona non grata in England.

Stratford Caldecott in "Why We Need Coventry Patmore" (Communio 2014) notes that Patmore's writing is a poetic expression of St John Paul II's Theology of the Body almost a hundred years older than the Pope's groundbreaking exegesis of faith and sexuality. And in Patmore's diligent exploration and…

The Spiritual Autobiography of a Love: A Severe Mercy by Sheldon Vanauken

A Severe Mercy by Sheldon Vanauken (1977, Harper & Row) is a memoir of the author Sheldon "Van" Vanauken and his true love Jean "Davy" Davis but is self-described by the author as "the spiritual autobiography of a love rather than the lovers." The book has two essential parts, the first "pagan" and the second after the couple's conversion to Christianity while at Oxford up until tragedy befalls their relationship and its aftermath. It also chronicles the couple's friendship with C.S. Lewis including several letters that include outstanding spiritual advice.

In what Van calls the pagan beginnings of their relationship, Van and Davy, agnostics devoted to beauty and truth, meet and from their first date discover their connection, in a moment Van describes using C.S. Lewis's words defining Friendship: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself ..." From there, their love grows to heights and depths that I recognized a…